Unlikely to be Forgotten: Assessing the Implementation of Google Spain in the UK Three Years On, by David Erdos

Introduction In finding that search engines had positive data protection obligations arising from their indexing of public domain personal data, the Google Spain ʻright to be forgottenʼ ruling in May 2014 quickly came to symbolize the breadth and ambition of EU data protection.  Given that the UK has often been rather critical of these characteristics of EU law in this area, it might be expected … Continuer de lire Unlikely to be Forgotten: Assessing the Implementation of Google Spain in the UK Three Years On, by David Erdos

The “right to be forgotten” as the right to remove inconvenient journalism? An Italian perspective by Giulia Tiberi

Abstract: In the multitude of terms that have been used in recent years in the legal literature (right to forget, right to erasure, right to delete, right to oblivion, right to social forgetfulness), the one that prevailed, the “right to be forgotten”, despite its catchy terminology, is quite a generic expression that often does not make justice to the concepts it means to carry, and … Continuer de lire The “right to be forgotten” as the right to remove inconvenient journalism? An Italian perspective by Giulia Tiberi

What should be forgotten? Time to make sense of Article 17 GDPR from the point of view of data controllers, by Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

The Court of Justice of the European Union’s recognition of a right to obtain the removal of one’s personal data displayed in search engine results (Case C-131/12, Google Spain, EU:C:2014:317) has opened policy discussions on the conditions under which individuals’ data are to be deleted by data controllers. Those discussions culminated in Article 17 of the new General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679  (GDPR) explicitly stating … Continuer de lire What should be forgotten? Time to make sense of Article 17 GDPR from the point of view of data controllers, by Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

Implementing the Right To Be Forgotten: towards a co-regulatory solution ? by N. Zingales and A. Janczuck

Abstrat: In Google Spain, the CJEU established a so called “right to be forgotten” (RTBF) from the results of search engines for individuals claiming that the information available at a link prompted by a search for their name is “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive”. This judgment is revolutionary not only for the far-reaching consequences of the principle it sets up, but also … Continuer de lire Implementing the Right To Be Forgotten: towards a co-regulatory solution ? by N. Zingales and A. Janczuck

Right to Be Forgotten and minors, by Ricard Martínez

Résumé: Dans ce post, Ricard Martínez expose les défis générés par Internet dans le cadre de la protection du droit des mineurs à l’oubli. Il y décrit le risque que provoquent les nombreuses publications de photos et de vidéos exposant des mineurs. Il conclut que la politique préventive de préservation des droits des mineurs et de leur données devrait être renforcée. What is the identity of a … Continuer de lire Right to Be Forgotten and minors, by Ricard Martínez

The Right To Be Forgotten as a positive force for freedom of expression, by Paul Bernal

Le droit à l’oubli : une force positive pour la liberté d’expression, par Paul Bernal Résumé: Cet article présente l’approche contre-intuitive selon laquelle, plutôt que d’être une menace pour la liberté d’expression et l’accès à l’information, le droit à l’oubli – si appliqué de manière convenable et transparente – peut y contribuer de manière positive. De plus, l’article suggère que le droit à l’oubli peut … Continuer de lire The Right To Be Forgotten as a positive force for freedom of expression, by Paul Bernal

Le programme de la semaine de notre e-conférence sur le droit à l’oubli en Europe et au-delà

Nous entamons ce jour la deuxième semaine de notre e-conférence, dont voici le programme. (Re) voir les contributions publiées ICI N’hésitez pas à mettre des commentaires dans les posts pour poser vos questions aux auteurs ou réagir sur un point. Bonne lecture Continuer de lire Le programme de la semaine de notre e-conférence sur le droit à l’oubli en Europe et au-delà

Le droit à l’oubli numérique en Suède, par Patricia Jonason

Abstract: Google has received about 15,000 requests for delisting regarding Swedish websites. Yet, in more than half of the cases the American search engine operator refused to remove the disputed websites from their results. What kind of help may individuals to whom a request for delisting has been denied expect from public authorities expect from public authorities? In other words, how do the Swedish authorities … Continuer de lire Le droit à l’oubli numérique en Suède, par Patricia Jonason

Le droit à l’oubli dans l’ordre juridique italien, par Pietro Falletta

 Abstract: In Italy, the right to be forgotten is framed by the Code on the protection of personal data. It is based on the respect of the rights and fundamental freedoms and the protection of human dignity, more specifically on the respect of discretion and the right to the protection of personal data. In addition, it entails the conformity of the processing of personal data … Continuer de lire Le droit à l’oubli dans l’ordre juridique italien, par Pietro Falletta

Trois enseignements à tirer de la mise en oeuvre juridictionnelle de l’arrêt Google Spain, par Olivia Tambou

Three lessons from the judicial implementation of the Google Spain Case in France, by Olivia Tambou, Associate professor at the University Paris-Dauphine Asbract: In French law, we find a dozen referrals to the courts regarding the right to de-listing. The national judge is the usual judge of the right to de-listing. This affirmation has a particular meaning in France, a country with a dual judicial … Continuer de lire Trois enseignements à tirer de la mise en oeuvre juridictionnelle de l’arrêt Google Spain, par Olivia Tambou